Fat Men in Art

The fat masculine figure in painting, drawing, sculpture, and illustration.


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artgalleryofontario:

After Dinner, c. 1850 Thomas Rowlandson (British) Watercolour painting, pen and brown, vermilion, and grey ink, and watercolour over graphite on wove paper on original mount with hand-drawn border,  23.4 x 36.7 cm Purchase, 1937

artgalleryofontario:

After Dinner, c. 1850
Thomas Rowlandson (British)
Watercolour painting, pen and brown, vermilion, and grey ink, and watercolour over graphite on wove paper on original mount with hand-drawn border, 23.4 x 36.7 cm
Purchase, 1937

onlyartists:

Thomas Rowlandson
Study for The Covent Garden Night Mare (1784)
This is the original drawing by Rowlandson for his caricature print, ‘The Covent Garden Night Mare’. Rowlandson has based his design on Fuseli’s The Nightmare. He may have seen the painting at the Royal Academy exhibition in 1782, or copied it from a printed reproduction.

onlyartists:

Thomas Rowlandson

Study for The Covent Garden Night Mare (1784)

This is the original drawing by Rowlandson for his caricature print, ‘The Covent Garden Night Mare’. Rowlandson has based his design on Fuseli’s The Nightmare. He may have seen the painting at the Royal Academy exhibition in 1782, or copied it from a printed reproduction.

houghtonlib:

Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827. “The Dutch Academy”, ca. 1820.
HEW 9.13.15
Houghton Library, Harvard University

houghtonlib:

Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827. “The Dutch Academy”, ca. 1820.

HEW 9.13.15

Houghton Library, Harvard University

centuriespast:

Jambhala, late 13th century
Tibet (?), 1275-1299Brass and gilt copper with semiprecious stones and pigment
Jambhala is the Buddhist god of wealth. Befitting his exalted position, he is richly adorned with a profusion of jewelry, and is rather rotund. His bulging eyes suggest that he is guarding his treasures and he squeezes the neck of a mongoose with his left hand, who spits forth a stream of gems. He sits in a relaxed posture upon a lotus pedestal and is draped with a garland of blue lotuses. In the Tibetan pantheon, Jambhala is also regarded as a guardian of the Buddhist faith.
Norton Simon Museum

#squeezing the mongoose neck

Is that what they’re calling it these days?

centuriespast:

Jambhala, late 13th century

Tibet (?), 1275-1299
Brass and gilt copper with semiprecious stones and pigment

Jambhala is the Buddhist god of wealth. Befitting his exalted position, he is richly adorned with a profusion of jewelry, and is rather rotund. His bulging eyes suggest that he is guarding his treasures and he squeezes the neck of a mongoose with his left hand, who spits forth a stream of gems. He sits in a relaxed posture upon a lotus pedestal and is draped with a garland of blue lotuses. In the Tibetan pantheon, Jambhala is also regarded as a guardian of the Buddhist faith.

Norton Simon Museum

#squeezing the mongoose neck

Is that what they’re calling it these days?